Monthly Archives: September 2008

Using Emailchemy on corrupt PST files

Inbox Repair Tool on Windows Vista

Inbox Repair Tool on Windows Vista

Outlook PST files have a very complicated internal database structure, which is read from and written to probably thousands of times every day, and they tend to be quite large. The combination of these characteristics, combined with the fact that Outlook and Windows do crash every now an then, makes the Outlook PST file somewhat susceptible to data corruption.

It can be random, and you may not even notice it right away, but even if a single bit gets flipped from a “0” to a “1” in a PST file, you could lose messages or the ability to even open the PST file in Outlook.

How do you know if a PST file is corrupt? There are major tells, like if Outlook tells you, for example, when you try to open it, or, if Outlook crashes when you try to open a particular message or open a particular folder in the PST data. But sometimes it is more subtle, like you may discover messages or attachments have disappeared, search no longer returns any results, or you can’t move messages in or out of the PST file. These are the cases that you may not notice in normal day-to-day use, but when you want to export your email from Outlook PST files with a utility like Emailchemy, you just might.
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Recovering email from a corrupt Entourage Database file

Someone recently wrote in asking how to recover email from a corrupt Entourage Database file and then how to get the email into a new version of Entourage. Specifically, the asker had a file that Entourage 2008 could not import or upgrade from an earlier version, and he had tried all the various methods of rebuilding that Entourage provides. Here is my answer to him, which I thought others would find useful too:
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Using Emailchemy’s Google Apps Uploader tool

Emailchemy's Google Apps Uploader tool

Emailchemy's Google Apps Uploader tool

Emailchemy’s Google Apps Uploader tool gives you the option of selecting a few different kinds of automatic labeling. If you select “Full Hierarchy”, then the entire folder hierarchy (path) will become a label. Gmail uses these labels for faking IMAP folders to an IMAP client. The other is to select “Each Subfolder”, which will break apart the path string into individual labels, so “/2004/work/project_x” will become 3 separate labels: “2004”, “work”, and “project_x”.

Which to use? I like both. That way, you get to preserve the original hierarchy and still have the flexibility of “tags”.